Senecio Haworthii

Synonyms:

Caputia tormentosa
Cacalia haworthii
Cacalia tomentosa
Kleinia cana
Kleinia haworthii
Kleinia tomentosa
Notonia vestita
Senecio quinquangulatus
Senecio vestitus

Habitat:

Is a perennial succulent that grows in the Cape Provinces of South Africa, usually between the altitudes of 900 and 1200 meters. Originally never reach a huge height ,a mature Senecio haworthii reaches 10-25 centimeters.

Description:

It is a small succulent that generally does not exceed 60 cm. in height.
This plant generates a bushes with erect stems and long leaves covered with fine silver white fuzz.
Bright yellow flowers appear in summer.

Cultivation:

It’s very easy to care for.
Like other Senecio is a drought tolerant plant, meaning that it can go long periods of time between waterings. One of the most common causes of cacti death is overwatering, so under-watering is most definitely preferable to overwatering.
We recommended limited watering in summer and re- water when the soil is completely dry.
Senecio haworthii needs well-drained sandy loams, and need to grow in full sun or partial shade .
Do not grow the Senecio haworthii in temperature below f 25-30 F. (-6 to -1 C.) If the climate in your area reach this temperature regularly, put it in a sheltered location or better indoors.

Propagation:

There are two easy methods propagating.The first of these is to propagate via leaves. Simply gently twist off a leaf from the stem of the plant and leave it to dry out for a couple of days. Then place the leaf on soil and mist every few days.
Within a couple of weeks, roots should start to appear. The other propagation method is to cut a portion of stem from the plant. Then leave it to dry out for a couple of days before placing the piece on soil.

Curiosity:

Senecio Haworthii is known as many name as woolly senecio  or cocoon plant on account of its fluffy white leaves.
The term ‘Senecio’ comes from the Latin word for ‘Old Man’ and refers to the furry nature of the succulent plant.

Official Web Site:
www.giromagi.com

Italian Blog:
www.giromagicactus.com

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